New York City, Manhattan Bridge
New York City, Manhattan Bridge
New York City, The World building.
New York City, The World building.
New York City, The Gilsey House.
New York City, The Gilsey House.
Los Angeles, The Eastern Building
Los Angeles, The Eastern Building
Los Angeles, The Beverly Theatre
Los Angeles, The Beverly Theatre
Los Angeles, LA Theater
Los Angeles, LA Theater
New York City, Old NYC post office, 1880
New York City, Old NYC post office, 1880
ORPHIEUM.jpg
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Las Vegas, Dunes Hotel
Las Vegas, Dunes Hotel
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THE SANDS HOTEL.jpg
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The High Line.
The High Line.
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The Fire on 18th St.
The Fire on 18th St.
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u.s. Customs House
u.s. Customs House
The Singer Building.
The Singer Building.
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The building of the Manhattan Bridge.
The building of the Manhattan Bridge.
The Breslin, New York City.
The Breslin, New York City.
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BEVERLY HILLS .jpg
BRIDGE.jpg
Brooklyn Bridge, NYC
Brooklyn Bridge, NYC
Grand Central Station Clock
Grand Central Station Clock
The Puck Building, NYC
The Puck Building, NYC
NYC tenement building 1910
NYC tenement building 1910
Gilsey House, New York City
Gilsey House, New York City
Temple court
Temple court
The Knox Building, NYC
The Knox Building, NYC
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New York City, Manhattan Bridge
New York City, Manhattan BridgeMy most favorite bridge in New York city, built in 1909.
New York City, The World building.
New York City, The World building.This building was at the epicenter of the NYC publishing world a long time ago.
New York City, The Gilsey House.
New York City, The Gilsey House.Gilsey House is still there!! It was once a famous hotel where Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde and others would discuss the news of the day.
Los Angeles, The Eastern Building
Los Angeles, The Eastern Building
Los Angeles, The Beverly Theatre
Los Angeles, The Beverly Theatre
Los Angeles, LA Theater
Los Angeles, LA Theater
New York City, Old NYC post office, 1880
New York City, Old NYC post office, 1880The City Hall Post Office and Courthouse was a building designed by the architect Alfred B. Mullett for a triangular site in New York City along Broadway in Lower Manhattan, across City Hall Park from New York City Hall. The Second Empire style building, built between 1869 and 1880, was not well received. Commonly called "Mullett's Monstrosity", it was demolished in 1939 and the site was used to extend City Hall Park to the south.[1][2]
ORPHIEUM.jpg
ROXIE.jpg
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Las Vegas, Dunes Hotel
Las Vegas, Dunes Hotel
Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 2.11.18 PM.jpg
THE FRONTIER.jpg
THE SANDS HOTEL.jpg
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THE LANDMARK HOTEL.jpg
The High Line.
The High Line.ew York City
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The Fire on 18th St.
The Fire on 18th St.New York City
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u.s. Customs House
u.s. Customs Houseew York City
The Singer Building.
The Singer Building.
New york city FDNY.jpg
The building of the Manhattan Bridge.
The building of the Manhattan Bridge.
The Breslin, New York City.
The Breslin, New York City.
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madison square garden 1890.jpg
BEVERLY HILLS .jpg
BRIDGE.jpg
Brooklyn Bridge, NYC
Brooklyn Bridge, NYCThe Brooklyn Bridge is a bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. It has a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), and was the first steel-wire suspension bridge constructed.Originally referred to as the New York and Brooklyn Bridge and as the East River Bridge, it was dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle,[7] and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since its opening, it has become an icon of New York City, and was designated aNational Historic Landmark in 1964[6][8][9] and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972.[10]
Grand Central Station Clock
Grand Central Station Clock
The Puck Building, NYC
The Puck Building, NYCThe Puck Building is an historic building located in the Nolita neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It occupies the block bounded by Lafayette, Houston, Mulberry and Jersey Streets.An example of the German Rundbogenstil style of Romanesque Revival architecture,[2] the building was designed by Albert Wagner,[3] and was constructed in two parts. The north section was built in 1885-1886, and the south addition in 1892-1893.[3] The front of the building – on Lafayette Street – was relocated in 1899 when the street – then called Elm Place[4] – was widened, this was supervised by Herman Wagner.[3] The building was rehabilitated in 1983-1984 and further renovated in 1995 by Beyer Blinder Belle.[3] The building sports two gilded statues by sculptor Henry Baerer ofShakespeare's character Puck, from A Midsummer's Night Dream, one on the northeast corner at Houston and Mulberry, and one over the main entrance on Lafayette.[3]The building is at the northwestern corner of Manhattan's NoLIta neighborhood, bordered by SoHo and the NoHo section of Greenwich Village. It is owned by Kushner Properties, the company of Charles Kushner, a major donor to Democratic politicians in New Jersey, and his son Jared Kushner, the owner of The New York Observer.Since 2004, the building has been used by New York University for the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the department of sociology. The building contains both office space as well as ballrooms for large events on both the top and ground floors, the latter of which also has retail space, which was added when the building underwent a large-scale renovation beginning in October 2011.  
NYC tenement building 1910
NYC tenement building 1910
Gilsey House, New York City
Gilsey House, New York CityGilsey House was designed by Stephen Decatur Hatch for Peter Gilsey, a Danish immigrant merchant and city alderman[2] who leased[2] the plot – which included the grounds of the St. George Cricket Club – from Caspar Samlar for $10,000 a year.[2][3][4][1] It was constructed from 1869 to 1871 at the cost of $350,000,[1]opening as the Gilsey House Hotel in 1872.[4][5] The cast-iron for the facade of theSecond Empire style building was fabricated by Daniel D. Badger,[3][1] a significant and influential advocate for cast-iron architecture at the time;[2] the extent to which Badger contributed to the design of the facade is unknown.[1]The hotel was luxurious – the rooms featured rosewood and walnut finishing, marble fireplace mantles, bronze chandeliers[4] and tapestries [1] – and offered services to its guests such as telephones, the first hotel in New York to do so.[3] It was a favorite of Diamond Jim Brady and Oscar Wilde, Samuel Clemens was a guest,[6][4][7][8] and it attracted the theatrical trade[3] at a time when the area – which became known as the "Tenderloin" – was becoming the primary entertainment and amusement district for New York's growing population,[9] with numerous theatres, gambling clubs and brothels.[2]Gilsey House closed in 1911 after legal conflict beginning in 1904 between the operator of the hotel, Seaboard Hotel Company, and the Gilsey estate over the terms of the lease.[10] Parts of the facade, such as cast-iron columns, which went over the property line were removed, and the building deteriorated, with rust, water damage and sagging floors.[4] In 1925, plans were filed to rebuild the structure as an ordinary loft building of brick and stone, but were never carried out,[1] although the ground-level storefronts were modernized in 1946.[2] The building's future was decided when it was purchased in 1980 by Richard Berry and F. Anthony Zunino and converted into co-operative apartments[4] after a cosmetic cleanup of the exterior, which won a commendation from the Friends of Cast Iron Architecture.[1] The facade was finally almost fully restored in 1992 by Building Conservation Associates.[9]
Temple court
Temple courtThis amazing building will soon be an epic hotel at 5 Beekman st, NYC.#nyc #manhattan #building
The Knox Building, NYC
The Knox Building, NYCWhen Edward Knox returned to New York City, a Civil War hero, his father’s business was in trouble. Not only had the Knox Hat Company’s store on Fulton Street burned to the ground in 1865, but a trademark law suit had put the firm in serious financial difficulties.Edward took over for his father with “the intention of making his name known wherever a hat was sold,” according to his obituary decades later in The New York Times. Knox succeeded in his intention.The second half of the 19th Century was a good time for quality hat sellers. No man would leave his home without a hat, whether a bricklayer or a financial mogul. There were specific hats for specific occasions and a gentleman’s closet would hold a silk top hat, a beaver business hat, a straw boater for casual recreation and other hats for other purposes. An entire set of etiquette regulated when to wear a particular hat, when to remove it, tipping it to greet a lady, and so forth. It was a time, as the AIA Guide to New York City said “when men were valued by their hats, or used them as a badge of social station and power.”Rather than continue to rely on the quality of other manufacturers, Knox opened his own factory in Brooklyn. In the meantime he had opened a store in the fashionable Fifth Avenue Hotel, in addition to the one in the Singer Building on Broadway.By the turn of the century, Knox was the premier name in hats in New York City and United States presidents came to him for their headwear. Before B. Altman, Tiffany or Lord & Taylor would make their incursions onto Fifth Avenue, Edward Knox broke ground. On the corner of 40th Street and 5th Avenue stood the brownstone mansion of Colonel Lawrence Kip who had died in 1899. Here Knox would build his new store and headquarters, opposite the site where the palatial New York Public Library would soon rise.Through his military standing, Knox was familiar with the work of architect John H. Duncan.  Dunan, in addition to his many residential projects, had designed the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch in Brooklyn’s Grand Army Plaza and General Grant National Monument (which would become better-known as Grant’s Tomb).
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